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Old-style Orthodox Christians mark Christmas

16:17 | 07.01.2021 Category: Social

Chisinau, 7 January /MOLDPRES/ - The old-style Orthodox Christians on 7 January mark the Birth of God (Christmas), which is one of those 12 kingly holidays, being preceded by a fasting period of 40 days.

The old-style Christmas is marked in Russia, Belarus, communities from Ukraine, Bulgaria, Armenia, Georgia, etc. The tradition to celebrate the Birth of God according to the old-style has been maintained also in Serbia and Montenegro, as the Serbian Church, just as the Russian one, continues to be guided by the Julian Calendar, as in some cantons of Switzerland.    

In Romania, the old-style Christmas is marked in the communities of Russians, Ukrainians and Serbians. Thus, the winter holidays for the Lippovan Russians who live in the Suceava county, Falticeni, Radauti and in the Gura Humorului town, as well as for those settled in Dobrogea, start on 7 January, when old-style Christmas is marked. For their part, the new-style Orthodox Christians honour Saint John the Baptist on this day.    

The separation of the Orthodox Church into the Old and New Style took place in 1923, when the Orthodox Church of Constantinople ruled to switch from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian one.

The difference between those who mark the old-style holidays and the ones who observe the Gregorian calendar consists in the fact that the new-style holidays on fixed date are marked by 13 days earlier. The only new-style holiday which observes the old Julian calendar is Easter; yet, although the date from the Julian calendar is its landmark, it is established depending on the new calendar.   

photo: protv.md

 

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